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If you live in Jupiter or the surrounding area in FL, and are looking for a place to bring your Furry Family Member home for their health & comfort care needs, Chasewood Animal Hospital is the place for you.

Chasewood Animal Hospital fills a special need in our Jupiter community for people who appreciate the focus on a warm & inviting family environment, where their pets are indeed an extension of their own two legged family members. Chasewood Animal Hospital is that much needed Veterinary Hospital where the "coming home" experience is coupled with State of the Art Veterinary care. Our home is a place where hard economic times are understood and addressed as only a true family can.

ONE Family, three roles. You are our valued Client Family Member. Your pets are nurtured and cared for as our Furry Family Members. Serving all your needs is the role of our warm and caring Staff family Members. Three roles, ONE Family...growing together and caring for one another.

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Dr. Maria Lowry brings an exceptionally warm and nurturing presence to Chasewood Animal Hospital, Her 30+ years of Veterinary Experience, combined with her caring nature will embrace you & your Furry Family Members and welcome them to our family.

Chasewood Animal Hospital will meet all your medical, surgical, and dental needs as well as provide emergency care. During your family visit with Dr. Maria you will find that she is experienced in all types of conditions and treatments. Like a good family "mom", Dr. Maria's emphasis is on educating and prevention, keeping you up to date and informed on the best health care plans for your Furry Family Member. We love to see families thrive and grow together here at Chasewood Animal Hospital.

Following through on our promise to educate, we offer a number of resources to facilitate our Furry Family Member's personalized health care plans. Browse around and look at our articles and pet videos. The best veterinary care for animals is ongoing nutrition and problem prevention. If you want to ask a question call 561-745-4944 or email us and we'll promptly get back to you.

Coming Home to Chasewood Animal Hospital requires a short trip to the Green Turtle Plaza, and you can find directions on our Contact Us page.


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Keep your pets hydrated

Every day we are bombarded with information about our health. It can be overwhelming but the repetition of key health information helps make the message stick. Eventually, the information sinks in and helps us make better choices that support our longevity.

For as much as we know about human health, pet health education doesn’t always get the same amount of press coverage. Yet we see more and more research and learnings that benefit both human and pet health. Universally healthy habits can be easier to adopt for our whole family yet, many of these are not discussed in parallel.

We found this to be true with hydration and daily water in-take for pets and people. As we have learned about how filtered water affects pet health, we saw similarities in human hydration needs. Proper hydration is critical and dehydration has serious and immediate hydration is importanthealth risks in humans and pets. However, most pet owners are unaware that their pet’s bodies are made up of a higher water percentage than their own human bodies.

Keeping pets hydrated is a simple habit that if can be an after-thought for many of us. Our pets need 1 ounce of water per pound of body weight. Most pets don’t get enough water, especially during extreme temperatures.

This led us to declare July as National Pet Hydration Awareness Month. We are working hard to get the word out to pet owners everywhere to be aware of their pet’s water in-take and limit their exposure to extreme temperatures, especially in what is usually the hottest month across the US.

Be aware of the signs of dehydration. Keep freshly-filtered water available to your pets at all times so they are enticed to drink the proper amount of water. Each time you reach for your bottle of water to keep yourself healthy and hydrated, think of your pet. These furry guys depend on us for access to fresh water. This July, join PetSafe in our quest to bring more awareness to Pet Hydration.

How are you remembering to keep your pets hydrated this summer?


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What Your Pet's Stools Say About Their Health 

  Want to know if your pet is healthy? Take a look at his or her stools.

Do you favor the rapid swoop-and-bag approach to picking up your dog's stools or scooping cat litter? Although most pet owners would rather not prolong contact with their pet's feces, sneaking an occasional peak can provide valuable clues about your furry friend's health and habits.

Brown, Green or Yellow: What Stool Colors Mean

Normal stools are brown, although stool color may vary slightly depending on your pet's diet. Feces get their brown color from bile, a liquid produced by the liver that aids in the digestive process. If your dog's stools are yellow or white, he or she may have a liver condition. Pale stools may also mean that digested food passes through the gastrointestinal tract too quickly or might indicate that there is a problem with your pet's gallbladder or pancreas.

Have you noticed that your pet's stools are suddenly black or red? Red stools or red streaks in feces occur when bleeding occurs in the lower part of the digestive tract. Black stools may be a sign of bleeding higher in the digestive tract. Although the blood was originally red, it darkens as it makes it way through the small intestines. Does your pet enjoy snacking on grass? Although the habit is usually harmless, it can turn the stools green.

Stool Odor and Consistency Is Just as Important as Color

Feces never smell good, but some bowel movements smell worse than others. All stools have an odor, but the smell shouldn't be overwhelming if your pet is healthy. Ideally, stools should be firm but pliant and resemble the sausage link segments.

Both diarrhea and hard stools can be a sign of health problem. Soft, loose stools may be caused by:

  • The Things Your Pet Eats. If your pet foraged through the garbage for table scraps or found something interesting to eat on his nightly walk, it's not unusual for diarrhea to occur.
  • A Change in Diet. Switching to a different brand or type of food can upset your pet's gastrointestinal system and cause diarrhea.
  • A Food Allergy. A food allergy or intolerance may affect food absorption in the gastrointestinal tract.
  • An Infection or Illness. Loose stools may be a sign of a viral illness or a bacterial or parasitic infection.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). IBD doesn't just affect people, but can make your cat or dog's life uncomfortable too. Other IBD symptoms include vomiting, flatulence, loss of appetite and weight loss.

Stools may be harder and smaller than normal if your pet is constipated or dehydrated. The problem can occur if your pet eats a high-fiber diet, eats pet food that contains too many fillers or has kidney disease.

If hip dysplasia or arthritis is a problem, defecating may become such an uncomfortable experience that your pet avoids it as much as possible. Unfortunately, ignoring the urge to go may cause constipation. Cats may occasionally develop constipation because they avoid using a litter box that's too dirty in their opinion.

If it's been a few days since your pet has had a bowel movement, it's time to make an appointment with the veterinarian. In some cases, constipation can occur due to a life-threatening blockage in the gastrointestinal tract.

Greasy feces or mucus-covered stools may also indicate a health problem. Mucus may appear due to an inflammation in the large intestine or rectum, constipation, food allergies, dietary changes, stress, constipation, infections or illnesses, polyps, tumors, or an infestation of tapeworms, whipworms or other parasites.

The Contents of Your Pet's Stools Provide Important Clues

It's not unusual to see small pieces of your lawn in your pet's stools if your dog or cat enjoys eating grass. From time to time, you may notice other objects in the stools, such as:

  • Hair. Hair may be particularly noticeable in cat feces, but can occur in any pet. Excess hair in the stools, coupled with bare spots on your pet's skin, may be signs of allergy or parasitic infestation.
  • Worms. If your pet's stools seem to move, it's not your imagination. you may spot a few wriggling worms that look like grains of rice in the stool if your pet has tapeworms. Roundworms resemble long strands of spaghetti.
  • Very Strange Things. Pets don't always limit their snacks to things we consider food. You may notice pieces of ribbons, string, aluminum foil, cotton balls, rocks or soap in your pet's stools.

Are you worried that changes in your pet's stools could be a sign of a health problem? Call us to schedule an appointment for your furry friend.

Chasewood Animal Hospital

2532 W. Indiantown Rd. A2

Jupiter, FL 33458

561-745-4944

According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), 43% of all dogs and 53% of all cats are classified as overweight. What's worse is that an additional 10% of all dogs and 19% of all cats are considered obese! Therefore, more than half of our dogs and cats are overweight or obese. So, should your pet start an Atkins Diet?

Ramsey is a "cheese-aholic". At 6 years old and 156 lbs, this Bull Mastiff listens for his owner to unwrap the cellophane from a cheese slice and then makes a beeline for the refrigerator. Joyce Sternberg, Ramsey's owner, says originally cheese was an incentive to teach Ramsey to shut the back door. As a result, Ramsey had become so heavy he actually tried to avoid walks. Dislike for exercise is a common theme for overweight pets. Irene Snow was chided by her veterinarian for allowing her Malamute mix, Yogi Bear, to balloon up to 127 pounds. An overweight pet is more prone to heart problems, poor skin condition, lameness, and more serious illnesses, like diabetes. A ground-breaking study actually details how pets who free feed live an average of two years less than pets with limited calories.

Without realizing it, many owners contribute to pet obesity through good intentions. "Some pets get twice as many meals each day because no one is in charge of feeding," says Dr. Steve Hotchkiss, veterinarian and owner of Hulen Hills Animal Hospital. Hotchkiss challenged Ramsey and Yogi in a "Biggest Pet Loser" contest. Over the course of eight weeks, a newspaper article tracked the pounds that they shed and the trials they endured. Ramsey's beloved cheese was the first thing to go and Yogi's new treats consisted of green beans instead of ice cream. Both pets were also encouraged to increase their activity levels.

Changes were apparent within just a few weeks and when the results were announced, both dogs showed significant weight loss. Yogi Bear had lost more than 14 lbs, making him the Biggest Pet Loser for the contest. Keeping it off has been more of a challenge though. Ramsey, on the other hand, continued his progress and eventually lost a total of 32 lbs! He is now at a trim 124 lbs. and Sternberg says he has the energy of a puppy and is excited about walks.

APOP says that pet owners should open a dialogue with their veterinarian about their pet's weight. The very first step should be a good thorough physical examination and associated blood work. This will help rule out diseases that cause weight gain, like hypothyroidism in dogs. Next, devise a diet plan with your veterinarian for safely reducing the number of calories being fed while also increasing the calories being burned through activity. Finally, make exercise a priority. Two or more brisk walks each day for our pudgy pooches and thirty minutes of playtime with your flabby tabby can help them lose that excess weight. With your love and commitment, your pet can lose that excess poundage which, in turn, could add years to your pet's life.

Tips to help your pet lose weight:
• Pets who are fed controlled portions of food live about two years longer than those who have unlimited access to the food bowl.
• Start your pet's diet with a trip to the veterinarian. A thorough physical exam and blood tests can help rule out diseases that can cause weight gain.
• Next, throw away the self-feeders and designate one person in the family to feed the pets. Feed a few small meals instead of one large meal.
• Replace high calorie treats with healthy alternatives like green beans or carrots.
• Increase your pet's activity level. Two brisk walks daily for your dog can help both of you shed the excess weight.
• Try to spend about thirty minutes each day playing with your cat. Kitty Teasers and laser pointers can really help them lose pounds.
• Follow up with your veterinarian and adjust your pet's diet and exercise routine as needed.


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