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If you live in Jupiter or the surrounding area in FL, and are looking for a place to bring your Furry Family Member home for their health & comfort care needs, Chasewood Animal Hospital is the place for you.

Chasewood Animal Hospital fills a special need in our Jupiter community for people who appreciate the focus on a warm & inviting family environment, where their pets are indeed an extension of their own two legged family members. Chasewood Animal Hospital is that much needed Veterinary Hospital where the "coming home" experience is coupled with State of the Art Veterinary care. Our home is a place where hard economic times are understood and addressed as only a true family can.

ONE Family, three roles. You are our valued Client Family Member. Your pets are nurtured and cared for as our Furry Family Members. Serving all your needs is the role of our warm and caring Staff family Members. Three roles, ONE Family...growing together and caring for one another.

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Dr. Maria Lowry brings an exceptionally warm and nurturing presence to Chasewood Animal Hospital, Her 30+ years of Veterinary Experience, combined with her caring nature will embrace you & your Furry Family Members and welcome them to our family.

Chasewood Animal Hospital will meet all your medical, surgical, and dental needs as well as provide emergency care. During your family visit with Dr. Maria you will find that she is experienced in all types of conditions and treatments. Like a good family "mom", Dr. Maria's emphasis is on educating and prevention, keeping you up to date and informed on the best health care plans for your Furry Family Member. We love to see families thrive and grow together here at Chasewood Animal Hospital.

Following through on our promise to educate, we offer a number of resources to facilitate our Furry Family Member's personalized health care plans. Browse around and look at our articles and pet videos. The best veterinary care for animals is ongoing nutrition and problem prevention. If you want to ask a question call 561-745-4944 or email us and we'll promptly get back to you.

Coming Home to Chasewood Animal Hospital requires a short trip to the Green Turtle Plaza, and you can find directions on our Contact Us page.





Reducing the Spread of Disease When You Have Multiple Pets

Do your pets do everything together, including sharing illnesses? These tips will help reduce the transmission of viruses and diseases. Body Text

What's worse than a sick pet? Three of them! Viruses and parasitic infections can quickly spread among your pets, making them feel miserable. Taking these preemptive steps when one of your furry friends shows signs of an illness can help you protect the health of the entire group.

Determine Who's Really Sick

Pets don't always show obvious signs of illness until they're very sick. The behavior stems from an instinctive desire to hide their illnesses from predators that tend to prey on weak animals. Unfortunately, those instincts may make it difficult to determine who's responsible for the puddle of vomit on your living room carpet or the pile of loose stools on the kitchen floor. Tracking down the culprit can be particularly difficult if your cats share litter boxes and you notice that one of them has developed diarrhea.

If you're not sure which of your pets is sick, separate them for the day. Place each of them in a separate room with adequate food or water. If you have cats or housetrained rabbits, be sure to include a litter box with fresh litter. Cover the floor with paper or wee mats to make clean up simple.

Although placing your dogs in their crates may seem like an easy way to determine which pet is sick, confining your pooches to small spaces may not be the best option if vomit or diarrhea is involved. In addition to cleaning the crate, you may also need to give your pet an emergency bath if he or she vomits or has an accident in the crate.

If you don't have enough room to separate each pet, sniff out the sick animal by process of elimination. Keep one pet in a separate room every day until you find out which of your furry friends isn't feeling well.

Prevent the Illness from Spreading

Whether one of your pets has a virus or a parasitic infection, there are a few things you can do to keep your other pets healthy, such as:

  • Quarantining the Sick Pet. Place your pet in a quiet room stocked with a soft washable bed, food and water. Your pet needs extra attention during an illness. Be sure to make regular visits to the room to check on his or her condition and offer a few reassuring words.
  • Washing Your Hands. Germs can linger on your hands after you pet your furry friend, clean up accidents or scoop the litter box. Wash your hands immediately after contact with a sick pet.
  • Cleaning Bedding. Wash bedding, towels, food and water dishes and other items that your sick pet has touched to prevent the spread of disease. Don't forget to clean brushes too. If one pet has mange, the disease can quickly spread to other pets if you use the same brush to groom them.
  • Using Separate Food and Water Bowls. Provide each pet with his or her own water and food bowl to prevent transmission of diseases through saliva.
  • Finding a New Elimination Spot. Most dogs can't resist sniffing feces. Unfortunately, illnesses and germs can be transmitted when your pets check out a mound of freshly deposited stool. Germs can even linger in the grass after you've picked up stool. If your sick dog is well enough to eliminate outside, take him or her to a new spot far away from the usual elimination area in your yard.
  • Keeping Vaccinations Up to Date. Vaccinations prevent your pets from developing a variety of illnesses, including distemper, rabies, bordetella and influenza. Because it takes a few weeks for your pet to build up immunity after receiving vaccines, it's important to ensure that all of your pets' immunizations are current.
  • Treating Other Pets. In some cases, your other pets may need treatment, even if they display no signs of illness. For example, if one of your pets has tapeworms, chances are that they all do.

Preventing the spread of illnesses and infestations is particularly important if some of your pets are older or are very young. Because these animals tend to have weaker immune systems, it may be more difficult for them to fight off illnesses.

Are you concerned about your pets' health? We offer effective treatments for common diseases and illnesses and can provide immunizations that prevent your pet from becoming seriously ill. Call us to schedule an appointment for all of your furry friends.

Sources:

Vet Street: Tips to Living with Multiple Pets, 10/1/12

http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/tips-to-living-with-multiple-pets

PetMD: How to Quarantine Your Pet

https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/how-quarantine-your-pet

ASPCA: Common Cat Diseases

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/common-cat-diseases

AVMA: Disease Risks for Dogs in Social Setting

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Disease-Risks-for-Dogs.aspx


According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), 43% of all dogs and 53% of all cats are classified as overweight. What's worse is that an additional 10% of all dogs and 19% of all cats are considered obese! Therefore, more than half of our dogs and cats are overweight or obese. So, should your pet start an Atkins Diet?

Ramsey is a "cheese-aholic". At 6 years old and 156 lbs, this Bull Mastiff listens for his owner to unwrap the cellophane from a cheese slice and then makes a beeline for the refrigerator. Joyce Sternberg, Ramsey's owner, says originally cheese was an incentive to teach Ramsey to shut the back door. As a result, Ramsey had become so heavy he actually tried to avoid walks. Dislike for exercise is a common theme for overweight pets. Irene Snow was chided by her veterinarian for allowing her Malamute mix, Yogi Bear, to balloon up to 127 pounds. An overweight pet is more prone to heart problems, poor skin condition, lameness, and more serious illnesses, like diabetes. A ground-breaking study actually details how pets who free feed live an average of two years less than pets with limited calories.

Without realizing it, many owners contribute to pet obesity through good intentions. "Some pets get twice as many meals each day because no one is in charge of feeding," says Dr. Steve Hotchkiss, veterinarian and owner of Hulen Hills Animal Hospital. Hotchkiss challenged Ramsey and Yogi in a "Biggest Pet Loser" contest. Over the course of eight weeks, a newspaper article tracked the pounds that they shed and the trials they endured. Ramsey's beloved cheese was the first thing to go and Yogi's new treats consisted of green beans instead of ice cream. Both pets were also encouraged to increase their activity levels.

Changes were apparent within just a few weeks and when the results were announced, both dogs showed significant weight loss. Yogi Bear had lost more than 14 lbs, making him the Biggest Pet Loser for the contest. Keeping it off has been more of a challenge though. Ramsey, on the other hand, continued his progress and eventually lost a total of 32 lbs! He is now at a trim 124 lbs. and Sternberg says he has the energy of a puppy and is excited about walks.

APOP says that pet owners should open a dialogue with their veterinarian about their pet's weight. The very first step should be a good thorough physical examination and associated blood work. This will help rule out diseases that cause weight gain, like hypothyroidism in dogs. Next, devise a diet plan with your veterinarian for safely reducing the number of calories being fed while also increasing the calories being burned through activity. Finally, make exercise a priority. Two or more brisk walks each day for our pudgy pooches and thirty minutes of playtime with your flabby tabby can help them lose that excess weight. With your love and commitment, your pet can lose that excess poundage which, in turn, could add years to your pet's life.

Tips to help your pet lose weight:
• Pets who are fed controlled portions of food live about two years longer than those who have unlimited access to the food bowl.
• Start your pet's diet with a trip to the veterinarian. A thorough physical exam and blood tests can help rule out diseases that can cause weight gain.
• Next, throw away the self-feeders and designate one person in the family to feed the pets. Feed a few small meals instead of one large meal.
• Replace high calorie treats with healthy alternatives like green beans or carrots.
• Increase your pet's activity level. Two brisk walks daily for your dog can help both of you shed the excess weight.
• Try to spend about thirty minutes each day playing with your cat. Kitty Teasers and laser pointers can really help them lose pounds.
• Follow up with your veterinarian and adjust your pet's diet and exercise routine as needed.


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